San Diego Caregivers

Blog, San Diego Caregivers / 04.03.2020

Driving is part of life in California. There are 26 million drivers sharing the road with you out there. And we spend a lot of time driving. In San Diego, the average one way commute is 24 miles. In Los Angeles, the average commute time one way is 32 miles.This month At Home Nursing Care decided to focus on traffic safety for our monthly training after four staff members were involved in accidents, three at no fault of their own. (Everyone is okay, thankfully.) During the training, we learned that 94 % of collisions are caused by preventable human behaviors. The Average driver will experience a collision every 10.57 years. San Diego is 119th safest city in US Los Angeles is 195th safest city in US (Source – Allstate Insurance).But accidents are on the rise, perhaps in part due to distracted driving when drivers are texting, eating, drinking, fiddling with the radio, etc. instead of paying attention to the act of driving.Distracted driving is dangerous, claiming 3,166 lives in 2017 alone.So before you look down at that text, keep this in mind. Texting is the most alarming distraction. Sending or reading a text takes your eyes off the road for 5 seconds. At 55 mph, that's like driving the length of an entire football field with your eyes closed.Finally, in this very condensed version of the training, remember that young people are the least safe drivers. Three (3) Age Groups most likely to be involved in fatal speed related accident:Under 20 year olds 20 to 24 year olds 25 to 29 year oldThese groups make up 50% of all speed related fatal accidents.So both watch out for younger drivers sharing the road with you and remind them about traffic safety if you know and love a young driver.In short, we reminded our staff to slow down, pay attention, review their insurance coverages and keep in mind that we care both about their safety and property and that of the clients who rely on us every day. There is no way to completely remove all risk, but by making smart choices and exercising good judgement, we can avoid unnecessary risks each trip we take....

At Home Care Solution, Blog, Caring for Elders, North County Home Care, San Diego Caregivers, San Diego Home Care / 04.10.2019

As part of our mission to continually measure our quality and improve our care, this year At Home Nursing Care adopted a quality assurance project focused on client hospitalizations. Our goals were to measure all in-patient stays accurately, note when they occurred, why, and especially, how often our clients had to return to the hospital within 30 days of discharge....

Lauren Reynolds, North County Home Care, San Diego Caregivers, San Diego Home Care, Uncategorized / 11.07.2017

California legislators always act as though they care about protecting the personal information of Californians, unless of course, there's a political or financial reason to go against their core value - which is exactly what's happening to cause a lawmaker and union to propose a new law which violates caregiver privacy.An Article written by Dan Morain of the Sacramento Bee sums it up in the headline, "In the name of helping workers, this bill would strip them of basic privacy."Put basically, Assemblyman Ash Kalra, D-San Jose, has an Assembly Bill 1513 that would "require that employees of private firms, who care for elderly and infirm people in their homes, must divulge their cellphone numbers, mailing addresses and email addresses to unions that seek to organize them."The Assemblyman claims the whole purpose is for the unions to be able to provide more training to the caregivers, but that's a patronizing falsehood. Our caregivers have wonderful and adequate training, at least 12 hours a year ongoing. I can't name a single caregiver who wants more training or less privacy.It's a veiled attempt at using power to support a special interest, the SEIU Union, which gives millions of dollars to lawmakers every year, and helped finance the campaign of Assemblyman Kalra.Home Care agencies across the state are speaking out for their employees, posting comments on the newspaper article and asking lawmakers to do what's right, now what they are paid by special interest groups to do. Our employees have no interest in having their personal information handed out to the highest bidder.The SEIU is the same union which has made 24 Hour Care too expensive for most elderly people, causing caregivers to lose their 24 hour shifts because lawmakers are too afraid to add a "sleep time" deduction that would allow the caregiver to not be paid while they slept overnight. This is what most other states allow, and the Federal Wage Orders allow for sleep time deductions, as well. However, California lawmakers refuse to correct this flaw in our state wage orders, out of fear of upsetting the union. As the minimum wage goes up, caregivers will lose these coveted 24 hour shifts and see their pay drop. That's not union protection.This is what I wrote in response to the Sacramento Bee article. I'm urging state Lawmakers to stop the assault on caregiver privacy.I am not comfortable with personal employee information being shared unless it's for public safety reasons under subpoena from appropriate authorities. That is real protection. To claim that this bill is about training is creating an obviously false sales-pitch. No one really buys that. It's a self serving bill with no true public interest and to insinuate otherwise is patronizing. More elected officials need to take the long view, what's best for California and our workers. No hard working caregiver wants her cell phone,...

Aging Parents, Alzheimer's/Dementia, Lauren Reynolds, San Diego Caregivers, San Diego Home Care / 10.07.2017

Denial is a powerful self-preservation tool - it helps to keep us hopeful and moving forward in bad situations. But denial of a parent's or client's lack of capacity with respect to credit cards and money is the perfect backdrop for financial fraud. Lack of financial capacity requires some sort of action to keep people safe.As providers of in home care, we see it all the time, a lady with "senior moments" in her 80's who is not "diagnosed" with dementia - so her family looks the other way while she pays bills late, uses her credit card to purchase home shopping network items daily or gives large financial gifts to relatives.I've had a client, a wonderful retired Judge who was 93, insist he hadn't paid SDG&E when in fact; he'd paid the same power bill numerous times. His daughter didn't want to interfere with his "independence".We recommend re-loadable debit cards to all of our home care clients, the kind that give daily or weekly spending alerts that can be monitored by a trusted designee. Our agency offers a card to our clients, and for non-clients, I recommend the Truelink Card.I'm always surprised that those who need it most turn it down because "Dad said no."In one case, Dad was a retired physician not diagnosed with Alzheimer's because his fellow physicians simply didn't want to label him with the disease. He carried multiple credit cards, one with a $60,000 limit. He gave gifts as well.It's very hard for a family member, fiduciary or power of attorney to insist that an elderly person is not making good enough decisions to stay in control of their finances.But taking control away from someone who can't monitor money, bills, bank and credit accounts is a crucial step towards protecting those we love and those we are caring for.If taking over entirely is out of the question – consider negotiating with the elderly person to have a second set of eyes on accounts – someone responsible to assist with review of charge card bills, etc.Have a no gift rule unless certain conditions met, including having all gifts in writing signed by the giver, receiver and a witness or responsible party. We have a policy that any gift over $25 must be approved in advance by the agency – to protect our clients, our caregivers and our reputation.If the elderly person uses credit cards, limit the number of credit cards in the house, there is typically no reason that someone elderly needs three or four credit cards. Fewer cards means less to review. Have petty cash in the house, along with a log to track cash expenses. Make sure receipts are kept and reviewed by someone regularly.Finally, never have a caregiver, housekeeper or neighbor help with paying the bills or help with banking. Hire a bookkeeper or...