Caring for Elders

Caring for Elders, Lauren Reynolds, Videos / 27.03.2020

Thank you to PFAC for hosting this eye opening webinar yesterday talking about COVID-19 and our aging population. The speaker is an Adjunct Professor from Stanford who is treating people with COVID-19.I encourage you to watch it, as I learned a great deal. Some of the key takeaways for me….The Virus stays on plastic for up to 72 hours… be sure to remove items you purchase that are in plastic (tomatoes), wash produce with soap and water and then store them in your own clean container. Do not use your reusable grocery bags when shopping – wash them now and put them away for later. Wearing a surgical mask when outside is not going to protect you unless you are ill and want to make sure you don’t “spray” when you sneeze or cough. The virus may be so small that two N-95 masks are needed, along with more face protection, if someone is working with a “Positive” client/patient. This is difficult with the current shortage. Keep that hand sanitizer handy – and do not, do not, do not touch your face! Keep washing your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds, especially after using the restroom or handling items, shopping, driving. Wash your hands right when you arrive in your home or someone else’s home, and wash your hands right before you leave.Thank you PFAC for this important information. I’m proud to an associate member and supporter for the last 8 years....

At Home Care Solution, Blog, Caring for Elders, North County Home Care, San Diego Caregivers, San Diego Home Care / 04.10.2019

As part of our mission to continually measure our quality and improve our care, this year At Home Nursing Care adopted a quality assurance project focused on client hospitalizations. Our goals were to measure all in-patient stays accurately, note when they occurred, why, and especially, how often our clients had to return to the hospital within 30 days of discharge....

Caring for Elders, Lauren Reynolds, San Diego Home Care / 12.07.2019

“Is there a doctor on the plane?!” Maybe it’s just a coincidence, but during my last trips involving air travel, I’ve witnessed two medical emergencies in flight. If you are traveling with an older or medically fragile person, or if you are up there in age yourself, there are some basic precautions that you might consider....

Aging Parents, Alzheimer's/Dementia, At Home Care Solution, Caring for Elders, Lauren Reynolds, North County Home Care, San Diego Caregivers, San Diego Home Care / 24.08.2016

[caption id="attachment_1886" align="alignleft" width="150"] Client with home care needs and her loyal caregiver.[/caption] Home care needs are inevitable for most of us, and planning instead of simply reacting helps promote a safer and less stressful home care experience for family members.  At Home Nursing Care is here to help with your home care needs.It's been called the Silver Tsunami, a burst in the number of elderly individuals and as a result, an increase in home are needs.  The Silver Tsunami definition is: a dramatic increase in the number of Americans who are 65 years or older.   Due in part to birth rates (the baby-boom), medical and scientific advancements, and more people are living longer.For the first sixty years of the 20th century, life expectancy grew by about 2.5 years.  But from 1960 to 2007 - life expectancy expanded by a whopping 4.2 years.  Currently, anyone fortunate enough to hit 65 has an average life expectancy of 18.6 more years.Keeping on the statistics train, 1 in 8 Americans is now 65 or older.  That segment currently makes up 12.9% of the population, but it will jump to 19.3& of the population by 2030, according to the US Department of health and Human Services.Many older people live alone.  Since older women outnumber older men and have longer live spans, half of all women aged 75 and older live alone.[caption id="attachment_1211" align="alignleft" width="150"] Loren is the exception - this home care client lived to nearly 103![/caption]In California, 25% of all seniors live by themselves, and about of third of those seniors have some form of disability.Being able to age comfortably, either in place or in a suitable assisted living environment, takes some planning, especially financial planning.   A recent AARP study found that 31.6 % of seniors have experienced a substantial decline in their home's value over the last three years, and a quarter of all seniors have exhausted their personal savings.Paying for in-home care, such as the care offered by my company, At Home Nursing Care, can feel out of reach for some seniors.  Those with good long term care policies experience less stress when hiring in-home help.  I know of a 60 year old man who pays $300 a month for his long term care insurance.  His father had Alzheimer's disease, so this man worries that within a couple of decades he'll need substantial home care.  His policy will currently pay $300 a day for care, an amount that will rise over time.  That amount should cover his needs, whether he chooses a live-in caregiver in his home or a specialized memory care community.Reverse mortgages are another option for seniors with limited cash reserves.  They are available to people 62 or older who own their homes.  The amount of money available is based on age, current interest rates and a home appraisal.  The draw-back is the cost/fees involved, so be sure to consult a financial planner and someone experienced with reverse mortgages.  Beware of potential scams. Home care clients are especially vulnerable to the...

Alzheimer's/Dementia, Caring for Elders / 06.04.2016

[caption id="attachment_1934" align="alignleft" width="1024"] At Home Nursing Care Caregivers Becoming Physicians[/caption][caption id="attachment_1941" align="alignleft" width="1024"] Buena Suerte! Good luck to our wonderful caregivers becoming doctors![/caption]At Home Nursing Care salutes our caregivers becoming family practice physicians.In our Culver City At Home Nursing Care branch, we held a breakfast send-off celebration to recognize four wonderful and dedicated caregivers who are well on their way to becoming  family practice physicians.Yoel is a physician from Cuba who immigrated to the United States under a special visa for Cuban professionals.   He and his wife, Alibet, also a physician from Cuba, took positions as caregivers with At Home Nursing Care while they attended a special UCLA program for foreign doctors.Both were licensed physicians in Cuba, but they needed to attend trainings and finish a credentialing program here in the United States.Yoel's 92 year old client was thrilled when he heard Yoel had been accepted into a Family Medicine Residency outside of Bakersfield, even though it means losing the future doctor as a caregiver."He is wonderful," said 92 year old Charles, "he will make an excellent doctor for people like me." (We found a wonderful new caregiver for Charles, but Yoel will be missed!)Alibet, who is finishing her credentialing and has been taking English lessons since she first began working with At Home Nursing Care nearly 2 years ago, is hoping to also start a residency program near her husband.   She provided 24/7 care to an elderly dementia client and had great reviews.   The couple is moving from Culver City to Hanford, North of Bakersfield."It's amazing to get these educated and dedicated future doctors and have them work inside the homes of clients they will someday serve medically.  It gives them valuable perspective that will improve care in general," said Adriana Beischl, District Manager for the At Home Nursing Care Culver City Office.Yoel and Alibet have already referred more of their colleagues to apply with At Home Nursing Care.  We are honored to have their colleages join us and we wish Yoel, Alibet, and their colleages best wishes and good luck! [caption id="attachment_1935" align="alignleft" width="1024"] Enjoying breakfast[/caption]     ...

Caring for Elders / 03.05.2013

The nurses, caregivers and staff of At Home Nursing Care understand that better nutrition can lead to better recovery and healing.This connection is very clear in a story about a 62 year old man who for 9 months suffered with a large diabetic wound on his foot.  He was only a couple of weeks away from amputation of his leg because of the sore.For months, his nurses and doctors had done everything they could think of to close the wound, from IV’s full of antibiotics to topical creams.  But the wound just wouldn’t get better.Shortly before the scheduled amputation, dietician Nancy Collins was brought in by the doctors to give her advice.“It’s not every day you get to save a man’s leg,” she says, but that’s exactly what she did.She didn’t turn to some expensive, fancy new medical device or experimental treatments.  She simply improved his nutrition.[caption id="attachment_859" align="alignright" width="150"] A nutritious, high protein meal[/caption]“Nutrition has a role in 12 of the top 15 causes of death,” she said, “but it’s been neglected historically.”Collins added more protein into the man’s diet, made sure he got at least 3,000 calories a day to fuel healing, and she had him drink water mixed with a powder called “Juven”, a combination on glutamine, arginine and HMB (amino acids.)  He drank two packets a day for 12 weeks, while his doctors continued the topical treatments on his foot.[caption id="attachment_868" align="alignleft" width="150"] Juven Powder Supplement[/caption]Thanks to his improved nutrition, his body was able to grow tissue, something that wasn’t happening before, and his foot wound finally closed.“Instead of losing his leg, he went on a cruise with his wife,” she said.Collins recently spoke at annual conference for the California Association for Health Services at Home, a group of home-based providers including At Home Nursing Care. Our staff members attended the conference to learn how to improve the quality of life of our clients and patients.Collins explained that nutrition is often the missing link in recovery, one that is too often overlooked in the medical community.And nutrition doesn’t just mean the amount of food someone eats or the amount of fat stores in the body; it’s the quality of food and the amount of amino acids and protein.“With just a 10% loss of lean body mass, wound healing is impaired, “she said.A 20% loss causes wound healing to cease and a 40% loss of lean body mass leads to death, usually from pneumonia, Collins explained.She says that most patients do not take in enough calories or protein to sustain their lean body mass, which peaks for people at age 25 and then goes downhill from there.Malnourished patients are significantly more likely than well-nourished patients to experience re-hospitalizations.  Nutrition, or the lack of it in nursing or rehabilitation centers, plays a role in 61% of malpractice lawsuits, she said, because patients who are malnourished are 200% to 500% more likely to develop pressure wounds.Why are patients not eating enough or the right kinds of foods?  Collins sites cognitive problems, financial problems, fatigue...